The Super Salmon – Worth your 25 minutes

The Super Salmon by Ryan Peterson is a fantastic conservation video featuring Alaska’s Susitna River and threats it faces from a proposed dam. Following the incredible journey made by a Salmon, the film features the people and places that call this river home. The Susitna is an incredibly diverse ecosystem for Alaskan wildlife – and livelihoods for many – but is under attack from a few folks who only see dollar signs.

At 25 minutes long you won’t want to sneak this one in at work. Lunchbreak?

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  • I have a few comments so bear with me. As for the salmon video today, cool videography and informative. As for the proposed dam on the Susitna as well as many other waterways we fish: beginning on Inauguration Day, the20th, gear up. The importance of protecting our natural resources will, on that day, drop off the top ten list of federal considerations as will the existence of public lands preservation in order to make room for the advancement and proliferation of giant corporate interests and major players in the world of big business. Prepare to defend our natural resources against mining, oil exploration, dams, and lumbering. Sorry. I’ll get off my soapbox.
    Secondly, did no one read the post by Braden about winter flies and fishing? Well written, good visuals and great info from a young man who obviously wants the blog followers to try an outing or two this winter; to expand their enjoyment and involvement in a great pastime. Great stuff, Braden. I thought you would get a ton of positive input. The fraternity of winter fishermen on the Mo is quite small compared to the ‘Horn and other waters. If you are not a nympher or streamer chucker, from now til March is the perfect time to learn! The pace is slower, the air is refreshing, the techniques are uncomplicated and the fly list is short and affordable. The weather hasn’t been the best but it won’t stay arctic forever. My coffee buddies talk about the daily HH blog every morning and they have two requests Braden (or Mark or John) I tell them what I do but they know I’m half crazy, and they are zeroed in on the usual Missouri size 16 to 20 summer hatch slot, they often read “think pink” or go lightningbug shiny but no one ever specifies the best sizes or the sizes they themselves use. I prefer overly large Rays and sow bugs very heavy pointflies and outrageously hot pink colors. Tell em in a post what you nymph with- the sizes etc- and why. And, since many are DFOs, a discussion about wintertime bobbers along with visuals of the different styles and brands would also be great. For some reason perhaps known only to their therapists, a lot of veteran quality anglers (such as my coffee buddies) cannot bring themselves to walk into a shop and ask for help and instruction for fear that their ability may be questioned. Angler’s envy?
    Lastly, thanks for the photo on Facebook of the bridge to the island at Rhoda’s. I’ve stood right there so many hundreds of times and seeing the pic fired me up to quit moping about the weather and gear up for next week. Pretty sure I can be found there or in the channel between the two downstream islands on Wednesday afternoon practicing what I’ve been preaching.
    Thanks guys.

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